New Manager Assimilation Process

Intent
To accelerate the process of assimilating a manager with a new team.

Philosophy
Teams don't choose their managers, and often managers don't choose their teams. When a new manager is appointed for a team, there are often months of posturing and circling behavior as manager and team members observe and test each other, gradually learning how to work together. The New Manager Assimilation Process enables everyone to bypass this behavior by sharing information up front that creates a comfortable, aligned, and productive team structure immediately.

Objectives
In the New Manager Assimilation Process, you will learn how to:

  • Give the team a clear understanding of the new manager's expectations, leadership style, and non-negotiable values

  • Create an environment where the manager and team members can explore concerns, preconceptions, and potential issues openly and productively

  • Identify organizational issues that need addressing and to make initial plans for addressing those issues

  • Establish a communication process with a solid, long-lasting structure

Overview
Our consultants conduct confidential interviews with each team member and the new manager to identify common themes, concerns, and issues to be addressed. These questions focus on both the team leader and the team in general. Then, in a private preparation meeting with the new manager, the consultants present those themes and align on a process for the group meeting.

CPD's consultants facilitate that team meeting in which we provide a basic framework for effective communication about the issues involved, present key themes, and facilitate the exploration and resolution of those themes. We ensure that plans are made during the meeting to resolve any issues that arise but are outside the scope of the New Manager Assimilation Process.

Following the team meeting, the consultants debrief with the new manager and provide coaching on how best to continue developing as a leader with this team. Depending on the needs of the team and desired outcomes of the new manager, the team meeting is anywhere from one half-day to two days long.


 

 
 
Copyright © 2010 The Center for Professional Development, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Email Webmaster